Nutrition Support Pharmacy

Nutrition Support Pharmacy Specialty Certification (BCNSP)

Target Population: Pharmacists who address the nutritional status and direct care of patients receiving specialized nutrition support, including parenteral or enteral nutrition. 

Program Purpose: To validate that the pharmacist has the advanced knowledge and experience to promote the maintenance and/or restoration of optimal nutritional status through design and modification of individualized treatment plans, direct patient care, identification of nutrient deficiencies, preparation and administration of parenteral and enteral nutrition, and monitoring of nutritional status.

Currently there are over 1,050 BPS Board-Certified Nutrition Support Pharmacists.

Nutrition Support Pharmacy Specialty Council Members

The purpose of the BPS Specialty Councils is to develop standards and eligibility requirements for board certification, develop examinations and passing standards for certification, and review and approve professional development programs for recertification of board-certified pharmacists. Specialty council members are at the heart of the peer-reviewed and peer-developed nature of BPS Board Certification.

Angela L. Bingham, [Chair]PharmD, BCPS, BCNSP, BCCCP, FASPEN, FCCP, FASHP

Bingham is an Associate Professor of Clinical Pharmacy at the University of the Sciences – Philadelphia College of Pharmacy in Philadelphia, PA. She practices as a Critical Care/Nutrition Support Specialist at Cooper University Hospital in Camden, NJ and serves as the Program Director for the PGY2 Critical Care Pharmacy Residency Program. After receiving her PharmD from the South Carolina College of Pharmacy, she completed a PGY1 Residency at The Johns Hopkins Hospital and PGY2 Critical Care Pharmacy Residency at The University of Tennessee Health Science Center/The Regional Medical Center at Memphis. Her interests include nutrition support in critically ill patients and parenteral nutrition safety.

Todd Canada, [Vice Chair]PharmD, BCNSP, BCCCP, FASHP, FTSHP, FASPEN

Canada is a Clinical Pharmacy Services Manager and Nutrition Support Team Coordinator at the University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Division of Pharmacy in Houston, Texas. He earned a Bachelor of Science degree in pharmacy from the University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center and a post-baccalaureate Doctor of Pharmacy degree from the University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio. He completed a specialized residency in critical care and nutrition support at the University of Tennessee—Memphis and is Board certified in nutrition support and critical care.

Taylor Barnes, PharmD, BCPPS

Taylor Barnes is a pharmacist working in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit at Winnie Palmer Hospital for Women and Babies. Taylor earned her doctor of pharmacy degree from the South Carolina College of Pharmacy and the South Carolina Honors College in 2018 and two years of post graduate residency training in pediatrics at Children’s National Medical Center. Her areas of interest include pediatric critical care, nutrition services, and underserved populations.

Johanna D. Bezjak, PharmD, BCNSP

Dr. Bezjak oversees development and implementation of clinical programs and policies for health-system based home infusion and specialty pharmacies. She served as the first clinic-embedded pharmacist at a nationally renowned academic Digestive Disorder Center and continues to champion the pharmacist’s role in comprehensive outpatient nutrition support. Dr. Bezjak is an Adjunct Clinical Instructor for Duquesne University and University of Pittsburgh Schools of Pharmacy. In 2020, she established a new ASHP-accredited PGY1 residency program for which she maintains roles as Program Director and preceptor. Dr. Bezjak earned her Doctor of Pharmacy degree from Duquesne University where she was captain of their Division I tennis team as well as a violinist with the acclaimed Tamburitzans. She completed PGY1 residency training at the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center. Dr. Bezjak had the privilege of participating as a Board of Pharmacy Specialties item-writer and subject matter expert for CSP and Nutrition Support committees.

Sara Bliss, PharmD, BCNSP, BCPS, BCCCP

Bliss is a Nutrition Support Pharmacy Coordinator at Duke University Hospital in Durham, North Carolina. She received her Doctor of Pharmacy degree from University of Tennessee Health Science Center in Memphis, Tennessee. She completed a PGY1 Pharmacy Practice Residency and PGY2 Nutrition Support Pharmacy Residency at the University of Arizona Medical Center in Tucson, Arizona. Her interests include nutrition support in critically ill patients, parenteral nutrition safety, and transitions of care from hospital to home for parenteral nutrition patients.

Sarah Cogle, PharmD, BCCCP, BCNSP

Sarah Cogle is a Clinical Pharmacist in the Burn Intensive Care Unit and on the Adult Inpatient Nutrition Support Team at Vanderbilt University Medical Center in Nashville, TN. She earned a PharmD from Auburn University Harrison School of Pharmacy. She then completed a PGY-1 Pharmacy Practice Residency at East Alabama Medical Center in Opelika, AL and a PGY-2 Critical Care Pharmacy Residency at the University of Tennessee Health Science Center/Regional One Health in Memphis, TN. Her interests include nutrition support in critically ill adults and medication safety.

Beth Deen, PharmD, BCNSP, BCPPS

Beth Deen is the Senior Pediatric Clinical Pharmacy Specialist at Cook Children’s Medical Center in Fort Worth, where she has practiced for over 20 years. She provides daily parenteral nutrition consults both inpatients and outpatients. She completed her B.S. in Pharmacy from The University of Iowa, Doctor of Pharmacy from The University of Texas, and a Pediatric Pharmacotherapy Residency at LeBonheur Children’s Medical Center/The University of Tennessee at Memphis. She has been Board Certified in Nutrition Support since 1997 and Pediatrics since 2016. She also serves as the PGY1 Residency Program Director for Cook Children’s Medical Center.

Roland Dickerson, PharmD, BCNSP

Dickerson is tenured Professor of Clinical Pharmacy and Translational Science at the University of Tennessee Health Science Center in Memphis. He also serves as Clinical Coordinator and Clinical Pharmacy Specialist with the Nutrition Support Service at Regional One Health. He earned a Bachelor of Science degree in Pharmacy from Temple University, Doctor of Pharmacy degree from the University of Tennessee, and completed a Hospital Pharmacy Residency at Thomas Jefferson University Hospital in Philadelphia and Pharmacy Nutrition Support Fellowship at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. His practice and research interests encompass metabolic support of the critically ill patient.

Katayoon Kathy Ghomeshi, PharmD, MBA, BCPS, CPPS

Ghomeshi is a Medication Safety Officer at UCSF Medical Center and Health Sciences Assistant Clinical Professor at UCSF School of Pharmacy. She also is the Residency Coordinator and primary preceptor for the PGY2 in Medication-Use Safety and led in developing the program at UCSF Medical Center. Dr. Ghomeshi completed a PGY2 Medication-Use Safety Residency at the Johns Hopkins Hospital. During her residency, she trained at the Institute for Safe Medication Practices and the American Society of Health-System Pharmacists. Prior to that, she completed a PGY1 Managed Care Pharmacy Residency at Kaiser Permanente. Dr. Ghomeshi earned her Doctor of Pharmacy degree from the University of Maryland School of Pharmacy in Baltimore, Maryland. She completed a Master of Business Administration from the University of Baltimore/Towson University. She holds a Bachelor of Science degree in Neurobiology, Physiology, and Behavior from the University of California, Davis.

Carol J. Rollins, PharmD, MS, BCNSP, FASHP, FASPEN

Rollins is a Clinical Professor at the University of Arizona College of Pharmacy. Her practice experience includes development of home infusion clinical pharmacy services, coordinator for nutrition support, PGY2 nutrition support pharmacy residency director, and preceptor for PGY1 and PGY2 residencies. She received her BS in Pharmacy and PharmD from the University of Arizona. She completed a Nutrition Support Pharmacy Practice Residency at University Medical Center (UMC) in Tucson, Arizona. Carol received her MS in Food Science and Nutrition from Purdue University, West Lafayette, Indiana, and her initial Bachelor’s degree from Concordia College, Moorhead, Minnesota.

Gordon S. Sacks, PharmD, BCNSP, FASPEN, FCCP

Dr. Sacks earned a Doctorate of Pharmacy degree from the University of Texas (1994) after receiving his BS degree in Pharmacy from Auburn University (1989). He has completed a Pharmacy Practice Residency at Huntsville Hospital and a 2-year Nutrition Support Fellowship at the University of Tennessee Health Science Center, Memphis. During his tenure at the University of Mississippi (1995-2001), he achieved the rank of Associate Professor of Pharmacy Practice and was Coordinator of the Nutrition Support Team at University of Mississippi Medical Center, Jackson. Between 2001-2008, he was a Clinical Professor at the University of Wisconsin – Madison and Chair of the Pharmacy Practice Division in the School of Pharmacy. He was also Coordinator of the Surgical Nutrition Support Team at the University of Wisconsin Hospital and Clinics in Madison, WI. Starting in November, 2008, until July, 2018, Dr. Sacks served as Department Head of Pharmacy Practice at the Harrison School of Pharmacy at Auburn University, Auburn, Alabama. Beginning in July, 2018, Dr. Sacks joined Fresenius Kabi, USA, as Senior Director of Medical Affairs for the Parenteral Nutrition Market Unit. He has been a boardcertified Nutrition Support Pharmacist since 1995. Dr. Sacks is active in numerous scientific and professional societies, including the American Society of Health-Systems Pharmacists (ASHP) and the Society of Critical Care Medicine (SCCM). He recently served as the President of the American Society for Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition (ASPEN) from July 2015 – June 2016.

Vivian Zhao, PharmD, BCNSP, FASPEN

Zhao is a Clinical Pharmacy Specialist II working with the Nutrition Support Team at Emory University Hospital in Atlanta, Georgia. In 2021, she transitioned the existing PGY2 Nutrition Support Residency program into a new Nutrition Support Pharmacy Fellowship program for which she maintains roles as Program Director, Research Advisors, and Preceptor. Dr. Zhao received her Doctor of Pharmacy degree from Massachusetts College of Pharmacy in Boston. She completed a PGY1 Pharmacy Practice Residency and PGY2 Nutrition Support Pharmacy Residency at the Emory University Hospital. Her interests include specialized enteral and parenteral nutrition support, micronutrient deficiencies, and nutrition research.

Eligibility Requirements

An applicant for board certification in Nutrition Support Pharmacy must demonstrate all of the eligibility requirements listed below prior to sitting for the initial certification examination. Once all of the requirements below are met, an applicant will be deemed eligible to sit for the Nutrition Support Pharmacy specialty certification examination. If an applicant achieves a passing score on the Nutrition Support Pharmacy specialty certification examination, they may use the designation Board-Certified Nutrition Support Pharmacist, or BCNSP.

  • Graduation from a pharmacy program accredited by the Accreditation Council for Pharmacy Education (ACPE) or a program outside the U.S. that qualifies the individual to practice in the jurisdiction.
  • A current, active license/registration to practice pharmacy in the U.S. or another jurisdiction.
  • Demonstration of practice experience in one of the following ways:
    • At least three years of Nutrition Support Pharmacy practice experience after licensure/registration as a pharmacist1 within the past seven years, with at least 50% of time spent in the scope defined by the exam content outline; or
    • Successful completion of PGY2 pharmacy residency in Nutrition Support Pharmacy within the past seven years.*

*Eligibility claimed via PGY2 completion will not be accepted after July 31, 2028 due to the sunsetting of ASHP-accredited PGY2 Nutrition Support pharmacy residencies in 2021.

1All practice experience must be completed post-licensure/registration as a pharmacist. All applicants intending to demonstrate eligibility for any BPS certification examination utilizing the practice experience pathway must provide an attestation from their employer, on company letterhead, that verifies this experience accurately represents at least 50% of time spent in some or all of the activities defined by the applicable certification content outline. In addition, this practice experience must have occurred within the seven years immediately preceding the application. For more information, click here. A sample employer verification letter is available here.

2American Society of Health-System Pharmacists (ASHP)-accredited/candidate status PGY1 pharmacy residency, residencies accredited under the ASHP Accreditation Standard for International Pharmacy Practice Residency Programs, or Canadian Pharmacy Residency Board (CPRB)-accredited Year 1 pharmacy residency.

The rationale for the appropriateness of the requirements for BPS certification programs are based upon the following:

  • BPS recognizes individuals who graduate from a recognized school or college of pharmacy within the candidate’s jurisdiction. Those jurisdictions recognize and evaluate programs on the extent to which it accomplishes its stated goals and is consistent with the concept that pharmacy is a unique, personal service profession in the health science field. In the United States, the responsibility for recognizing schools and colleges of pharmacy falls to the Accreditation Council for Pharmacy Education (ACPE).
  • The rationale for requiring licensure or registration of pharmacists within their jurisdiction is based upon the fact that for public protection, all pharmacists must be licensed or registered. This is considered a baseline requirement to be a pharmacist specialist. In the United States, BPS recognizes the licensure process administered by the National Association of Boards of Pharmacy (NABP). The National Association of Boards of Pharmacy (NABP) aims to ensure the public’s health and safety through its pharmacist license transfer and pharmacist competence assessment programs. NABP’s member boards of pharmacy are grouped into eight districts that include all 50 United States, the District of Columbia, Guam, Puerto Rico, the Virgin Islands, Bahamas, and all 10 Canadian provinces.
  • The experiential component is required to help assure practical application of components of the specialty knowledge being certified. There are multiple pathways to meet the practice experience requirement. The faster eligibility pathways recognize accredited residencies through the American Society of Health System Pharmacists (ASHP). The ASHP residency accreditation program identifies and grants public recognition to practice sites having pharmacy residency training programs that have been evaluated and found to meet the qualifications of one of the ASHP’s residency accreditations standards. Thus, accreditation of a pharmacy residency program provides a means of assurance to residency applicants that a program meets certain basic requirements and is, therefore, an acceptable site for postgraduate training in pharmacy practice in organized health care.
  • Passing the BPS pharmacy specialty examination helps assure knowledge consistent with the validated content outline for the BPS specialty.

The appropriateness of the BPS program requirements are consistent with the Council on Credentialing in Pharmacy’s Resource Paper titled: Scope of Contemporary Pharmacy Practice: Roles, Responsibilities, and Functions of Pharmacists and Pharmacy Technicians.

Upcoming Deadlines

Individuals who meet the eligibility requirements for the BCNSP examination can find more information about examination dates and fees for certification examinations here

Candidate's Guide

The Candidate’s Guide is intended for use by pharmacists who are interested in becoming certified as specialists by BPS in any of the BPS-recognized specialty practice areas. To review critical information for BPS Certification Examinations, visit this page.

Content Outline for BCNSP

For the Fall 2023 Examination, refer to the Nutrition Support Pharmacy Content Outline found in the BCNSP Examination Specification document for details.

For the 2024 Examination Administration through March 2025, refer to the Nutrition Support Pharmacy Content Outline found here for details.

For the March 2025 Examination Administration and forward, refer to the Nutrition Support Pharmacy Content Outline found here for details.

Important Resources

Preparatory Courses for BCNSP Examinations

Certification is a significant differentiator, and the rigorous exam process requires concentrated study. Successful candidates are well prepared, and a number of available resources can assist pre-qualified applicants.

Suggested preparation for the examination might include:

  • The study of journal articles, textbooks or other publications related to the Content Outline.
  • Attendance at continuing education programs and courses in specialized pharmacy practice.
  • Participation in study groups and examination preparation courses.
  • Reviewing the sample examination items provided in order for candidates to familiarize themselves with the various item formats which are presented on the exam. Sample question performance should not be interpreted as an indicator of exam performance.

To maintain its strict, independent standards for certification, BPS does NOT provide review information, preparatory courses, or study guides. However, such materials are available from outside organizations, state or local professional associations and colleges of pharmacy. Potential applicants may contact the professional associations noted below for additional study resources.

The Board of Pharmacy Specialties provides the following program listing for informational purposes. This list is not an exhaustive list of options available for examination preparation. BPS does not endorse or provide preparatory courses for Board Certification Examinations.

 
Nutrition Support Pharmacy

BPS partners with Prometric to provide the examination. BPS does not have any other partnerships for the certification or recertification application process. BPS partners with professional development program (PDP) providers to provide continuing education (CE) for recertification and the relationship is noted here. Any organization claiming a relationship with BPS for the application process or providing CE labeled ‘BPS-approved’ outside of the organizations listed should be reported to BPS immediately.

Certification for Applicants Outside the U.S.

BPS would like to offer some helpful tips to candidates outside of the United States in order to make their application experience easier. To learn more about applying for board certification as a pharmacist outside of the U.S., visit this page.

Apply for ADA Accomodations

BPS complies with the relevant provisions of the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA). For applicants looking to request special accommodations in their application process, more instructions can be found on this page.

Frequently Asked Questions

After review of the BPS Candidates Guide and specialty certification page, some applicants may still have questions. Visit this page to see frequently asked questions from pharmacists pursuing board certification like you!

Sample Examination Items

Sample Items for BCNSP Examinations

The sample examination items for BCNSP examinations are made available by BPS for the purposes of familiarizing certification candidates and other stakeholders with the structure and format of BPS Certification Examinations. This is not meant for use as a self-assessment. Performance on any of these items does not correlate with performance on the actual examination.

The content of these examples is meant to be illustrative of actual examination items, but these items do not appear on the certification examination and are not meant to identify the scope of the examination. For a more comprehensive indication of the scope of the certification examination, please refer to the BCNSP Exam Content Outline.

Examination items are in multiple-choice format. The great majority of examination items are multiple-choice with a single response from among four options. Some examinations may include a small percentage of items that require selection of multiple (three or four) responses from among a larger set of available (up to eight) options. Examinations items may also be supplemented by an image.

View the examination items down below.

Which electrolyte abnormality is most likely to be observed in patients receiving continuous renal replacement therapy?

Hyperkalemia
Hypermagnesemia
Hyponatremia
Hypophosphatemia

Correct!

Incorrect!

A 30-year-old transplant patient develops a serum potassium of 5.8 mEq/L. The patient's medication regimen includes the following:

Tacrolimus 1 mg orally twice daily
Prednisone 20 mg orally twice daily
Hydrochlorothiazide 25 mg orally daily
Insulin glargine 10 units subcutaneously at bedtime
Levofloxacin 500 mg orally daily
Fluconazole 200 mg orally daily

Which medication is the most likely cause of this patient's hyperkalemia?
Hydrochlorothiazide
Insulin glargine
Prednisone
Tacrolimus

Correct!

Incorrect!

Alopecia, delayed wound healing, and fatty liver may indicate a deficiency in:

calcium.
dextrose.
lipid emulsion.
magnesium.

Correct!

Incorrect!

What are the Medicare Part B standard criteria for macronutrient requirements for parenteral nutrition?

Total 20-30 kcal/kg daily; protein 1.0 - 2.0 g/kg daily
Total 20-35 kcal/kg daily; protein 0.8 - 1.5 g/kg daily
Total 20-35 kcal/kg daily; protein 1.0 - 2.0 g/kg daily
Total 20-40 kcal/kg daily; protein 0.8 - 1.5 g/kg daily

Correct!

Incorrect!

What is the current recommendation for daily vitamin D supplementation to prevent rickets and vitamin D deficiency in healthy, breastfed infants?

200 IU
400 IU
600 IU
800 IU

Correct!

Incorrect!

Which intervention may decrease catheter-associated bloodstream infections in pediatric patients with parenteral nutrition-associated liver disease?

Antibiotic ointment at insertion site
Cyclic TPN
Ethanol lock therapy
Lipids < 1 g/kg/day

Correct!

Incorrect!

A patient with Crohn disease has been hospitalized for management of a small bowel obstruction. The patient's past medical history is significant for Crohn disease. The patient developed a fever on day 6 of parenteral nutrition. Two sets of blood cultures were drawn, one peripheral and one via the patient's peripherally inserted central catheter (PICC), and both grew gram-positive cocci. A transthoracic echocardiogram was performed and was negative. The final culture report indicated the pathogen was methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA). Which course of continued treatment is recommended for this patient?

Remove the PICC and continue vancomycin for 7 days.
Remove the PICC and continue vancomycin for 14 days.
Retain the PICC, and continue vancomycin for 14 days.
Retain the PICC, and continue vancomycin for 28 days.

Correct!

Incorrect!

Batch-prepared sterile products without preservatives are considered:

low risk.
low-medium risk.
medium risk.
medium-high risk.

Correct!

Incorrect!

Which total nutrient admixture would be considered the most unstable?

Dextrose 10%, amino acids 3%, lipids 1.5%
Dextrose 10%, amino acids 4%, lipids 2.0%
Dextrose 15%, amino acids 5%, lipids 2.5%
Dextrose 20%, amino acids 6%, lipids 3.0%

Correct!

Incorrect!

A study is designed to compare presence versus absence of pressure sores among patients receiving diet, patients receiving tube feeds, and patients receiving parenteral nutrition. Which is the appropriate statistical test to use for analysis of the data?

t test
Chi-square test
Kruskal-Wallis test
Mann-Whitney U test

Correct!

Incorrect!

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Nutrition Support Pharmacy Sample Questions

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Recertification Requirements for BCNSP

Pharmacists who earn the designation Board-Certified Nutrition Support Pharmacist® (BCNSP) are required to maintain their certification over a seven-year period by completing one of the following recertification pathways:

Option One: Recertification Examination

  • For BCNSP with certification beginning January 1, 2023 or earlier: Achieve a passing score on the recertification examination administered by BPS.
  • For BCNSP with certification beginning January 1, 2024 or later: Achieve a passing score on the recertification examination administered by BPS and self-report 20 completed units of continuing professional development (CPD) in MyBPS. For more information on CPD, review the FAQ. To maintain an active certification in good standing, a minimum of two units of BPS-approved, assessed CPE or self-reported CPD must be reported each year.

OR

Option Two: Professional Development Program

  • For BCNSP with certification beginning January 1, 2023 or earlier: recertification via professional development program requires 100 units of assessed CPE from BPS-approved professional development programs provided by:
  • For BCNSP with certification beginning January 1, 2024 or later: recertification via professional development program requires 100 units, comprised of 80 units of assessed CPE from BPS-approved professional development programs provided by:

Additionally, 20 units of continuing professional development (CPD) must be completed and self-reported in MyBPS. For more information on CPD, review the FAQ. To maintain an active certification in good standing, a minimum of two units of assessed CPE from BPS-approved professional development programs or self-reported CPD must be reported each year.

Year certified/recertified

New cycle start

(begin earning recert units)

Cycle expiration

(deadline to meet recert reqs)

Units required 

(PDP = professional development program)

20161/1/201712/31/2023100 units assessed CPE via BPS-approved PDP
20171/1/201812/31/2024100 units assessed CPE via BPS-approved PDP
20181/1/201912/31/2025100 units assessed CPE via BPS-approved PDP
20191/1/202012/31/2026100 units assessed CPE via BPS-approved PDP
20201/1/202112/31/2027100 units assessed CPE via BPS-approved PDP
20211/1/202212/31/2028100 units assessed CPE via BPS-approved PDP
20221/1/202312/31/2029100 units assessed CPE via BPS-approved PDP
20231/1/202412/31/2030100 units (80 units assessed CPE via BPS-approved PDP + 20 units CPD)
2024 onward1/1/2025 onward12/31/2031 onward100 units (80 units assessed CPE via BPS-approved PDP + 20 units CPD)

For full details regarding recertification, please refer to the BPS Recertification Guide.

Board-Certified Infectious Diseases Pharmacists® are required to pay the BPS Annual Certification Maintenance fee of $125 each year for years one through six and the $400 recertification fee in year seven. Individuals with more than one BPS certification are assessed one BPS Annual Certification Maintenance Fee each year. 

Upcoming Deadlines

Candidates are required to recertify every 7 years. Certificants must submit their recertification application no later than the deadline of August 4. BPS encourages candidates to submit their recertification application as early as January 1 of their recertification year.

Candidates who intend to recertify via examination should note the availability of the recertification examination and related application deadlines. Candidates recertifying their BCNSP credential by examination can find more information about examination dates and fees here

Candidates who intend to recertify via continuing education (CE) MUST submit their recertification application by the deadline date of August 4 even if they have not completed their CE requirements.

The deadline to complete the required CE for recertification is December 31 for all specialties. The board-certified pharmacist is responsible for submitting an application that is completely and accurately filled out. Incomplete and/or unpaid applications will not be processed. 

Recertification Guide

The Recertification Guide is intended for use by candidates renewing their certification. To review critical information for recertifying with the Board of Pharmacy Specialties, visit this page.

CPE Providers

BCNSP with certification beginning January 1, 2023 or earlier: recertification via professional development program requires 100 units of assessed CPE from BPS-approved professional development programs provided by:

 

BCNSP with certification beginning January 1, 2024 or later: recertification via professional development program requires 100 units, comprised of 80 units of assessed CPE from BPS-approved professional development programs provided by:

Additionally, 20 units of continuing professional development (CPD) must be completed and self-reported in MyBPS. For more information on CPD, review the FAQ. To maintain an active certification in good standing, a minimum of two units of assessed CPE from BPS-approved professional development programs or self-reported CPD must be reported each year.

Content Outline for BCNSP

For the Fall 2023 Examination, refer to the Nutrition Support Pharmacy Content Outline found in the BCNSP Examination Specification document for details.

For the 2024 Examination Administration through March 2025, refer to the Nutrition Support Pharmacy Content Outline found here for details.

For the March 2025 Examination Administration and forward, refer to the Nutrition Support Pharmacy Content Outline found here for details.

Important Resources

Apply for ADA Accomodations

BPS complies with the relevant provisions of the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA). For applicants looking to request special accommodations in their application process, more instructions can be found on this page.

Frequently Asked Questions

After review of the BPS Recertification Guide, some applicants may still have questions. Visit this page to see frequently asked questions from pharmacists renewing their board certification like you!

Sample Examination Items

Sample Items for BCNSP Examinations

The sample examination items for BCNSP examinations are made available by BPS for the purposes of familiarizing certification candidates and other stakeholders with the structure and format of BPS certification examinations. This is not meant for use as a self-assessment. Performance on any of these items does not correlate with performance on the actual examination.

The content of these examples is meant to be illustrative of actual examination items, but these items do not appear on the certification examination and are not meant to identify the scope of the examination. For a more comprehensive indication of the scope of the certification examination, please refer to the BCNSP Exam Content Outline.

Examination items are in multiple-choice format. The great majority of examination items are multiple-choice with a single response from among four options. Some examinations may include a small percentage of items that require selection of multiple (three or four) responses from among a larger set of available (up to eight) options. Examinations items may also be supplemented by an image.

View the examination items down below.

Which electrolyte abnormality is most likely to be observed in patients receiving continuous renal replacement therapy?

Hyperkalemia
Hypermagnesemia
Hyponatremia
Hypophosphatemia

Correct!

Incorrect!

A 30-year-old transplant patient develops a serum potassium of 5.8 mEq/L. The patient's medication regimen includes the following:

Tacrolimus 1 mg orally twice daily
Prednisone 20 mg orally twice daily
Hydrochlorothiazide 25 mg orally daily
Insulin glargine 10 units subcutaneously at bedtime
Levofloxacin 500 mg orally daily
Fluconazole 200 mg orally daily

Which medication is the most likely cause of this patient's hyperkalemia?
Hydrochlorothiazide
Insulin glargine
Prednisone
Tacrolimus

Correct!

Incorrect!

Alopecia, delayed wound healing, and fatty liver may indicate a deficiency in:

calcium.
dextrose.
lipid emulsion.
magnesium.

Correct!

Incorrect!

What are the Medicare Part B standard criteria for macronutrient requirements for parenteral nutrition?

Total 20-30 kcal/kg daily; protein 1.0 - 2.0 g/kg daily
Total 20-35 kcal/kg daily; protein 0.8 - 1.5 g/kg daily
Total 20-35 kcal/kg daily; protein 1.0 - 2.0 g/kg daily
Total 20-40 kcal/kg daily; protein 0.8 - 1.5 g/kg daily

Correct!

Incorrect!

What is the current recommendation for daily vitamin D supplementation to prevent rickets and vitamin D deficiency in healthy, breastfed infants?

200 IU
400 IU
600 IU
800 IU

Correct!

Incorrect!

Which intervention may decrease catheter-associated bloodstream infections in pediatric patients with parenteral nutrition-associated liver disease?

Antibiotic ointment at insertion site
Cyclic TPN
Ethanol lock therapy
Lipids < 1 g/kg/day

Correct!

Incorrect!

A patient with Crohn disease has been hospitalized for management of a small bowel obstruction. The patient's past medical history is significant for Crohn disease. The patient developed a fever on day 6 of parenteral nutrition. Two sets of blood cultures were drawn, one peripheral and one via the patient's peripherally inserted central catheter (PICC), and both grew gram-positive cocci. A transthoracic echocardiogram was performed and was negative. The final culture report indicated the pathogen was methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA). Which course of continued treatment is recommended for this patient?

Remove the PICC and continue vancomycin for 7 days.
Remove the PICC and continue vancomycin for 14 days.
Retain the PICC, and continue vancomycin for 14 days.
Retain the PICC, and continue vancomycin for 28 days.

Correct!

Incorrect!

Batch-prepared sterile products without preservatives are considered:

low risk.
low-medium risk.
medium risk.
medium-high risk.

Correct!

Incorrect!

Which total nutrient admixture would be considered the most unstable?

Dextrose 10%, amino acids 3%, lipids 1.5%
Dextrose 10%, amino acids 4%, lipids 2.0%
Dextrose 15%, amino acids 5%, lipids 2.5%
Dextrose 20%, amino acids 6%, lipids 3.0%

Correct!

Incorrect!

A study is designed to compare presence versus absence of pressure sores among patients receiving diet, patients receiving tube feeds, and patients receiving parenteral nutrition. Which is the appropriate statistical test to use for analysis of the data?

t test
Chi-square test
Kruskal-Wallis test
Mann-Whitney U test

Correct!

Incorrect!

Share the quiz to show your results !

Subscribe to see your results

Nutrition Support Pharmacy Sample Questions

I got %%score%% of %%total%% right

%%description%%

%%description%%

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Certification Verification

BPS offers the ability to search and verify a Board-Certified Pharmacist by name or credential number.